FIVB Beach Volleyball Drill-book - page 32

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© 2011 Technical & Development Department
Beach Volleyball Drill-book
THE SERVE
The serve is the only time when you have complete control over the point with respect to the
fact that the ball begins in your hand.
Teams that put strong serving pressure on their opponents generate more scoring opportunities
than teams with easy serves and as a result have more success and for this reason
considerable time should be spent developing the serve.
Make sure you get practice serving in different wind conditions and when the wind is traveling in
different directions across the court.
Beginner
For beginners an important concept to reinforce is the act of transferring weight from the back
foot to the front foot. Initially to encourage this you can get a server to lift up their front foot prior
to serving to ensure that all their weight is on the back foot. Reinforcing the correct motor
pattern regularly by completing a significant number of serves. Just be aware that repeated
serving with poor technique can exacerbate a rotator cuff injury caused by a weak or
imbalanced shoulder.
Intermediate
Because the game does not consist of repeated serves (unless you get on a sizable roll)
practicing small numbers of serves regularly will be more beneficial and more ‘game like’ Try to
break up serves with a run to the net to block or a defensive play of an attack before returning to
the baseline to serve again.
At this level you may want to discuss the idea of strategic serves and work on specific serves
that in particular wind conditions will be most effective. Using the wind becomes an important
factor in creating opportunities to win points off serve.
Advanced
At the advanced level serving is all about creating opportunities to score. Because the receiving
team has the first attack and a statistically higher chance of putting the ball down onto the sand,
winning points off the serve is extremely valuable. Aces are nice but even the best servers only
average about 1 per game. Serving strategy and ‘creating opportunities’ often revolves around
creating a less than perfect pass and set, or influencing the likelihood of the opposition playing a
particular shot. For example, if you serve deep are they more likely to hit or shoot? ... What
about if you serve short? …
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