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“Volleyball remains a clean sport,” says medical commission president to the Congress

 
Dr Roald Bahr also talked about some of the most promising medical initiatives undertaken in recent years
 

Anaheim, USA, September 21, 2012 – FIVB Medical Commission president Roald Bahr gave his presentation on how to keep volleyball a clean sport at the 2012 World Congress at Anaheim, USA.

Bahr explained the Anti-Doping Code, which was revised by the commission in 2008, and showed how the FIVB worked actively with the other major team sports federations to ensure the new code was adapted to the needs of volleyball.

He also mentioned that the World Anti-Doping Agency board has declared the FIVB to be fully code-compliant. The FIVB anti-doping programme includes routine in-competition doping control at all FIVB and continental competitions, programmes for collecting whereabouts information, and year-round out-of-competition testing in the registered testing pools for volleyball and beach volleyball. This has called for significant human and financial investments that have been fulfilled by the FIVB.

Bahr highlighted the referee health checks carried out during competitions and the procedures established to deal with the results of these examinations.

He also presented the results of the FIVB Volleyball Medicine Congress 2011 in Bled, Slovenia, held in collaboration with the Slovenian Volleyball Federation. The decision has been made to organise similar congresses every three years.

Finally, Bahr introduced the heat stress monitoring programme now being used for beach volleyball competitions starting with the World Championships in Stavanger in 2009. The programme collects data on heat conditions during all events on the World Tour, as well as any heat-related medical forfeits during the competition.





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