FIVB - Volleyball World Grand Prix

TEAM COMPOSITION


 RUS / Russia

 
Team manager Erkhov Andrey
Coach Marichev Iuriy
Assistant coach Kurnosov Igor
2nd assistant coach Ushakov Konstantin
Doctor Rasskazov Sergey
Physiotherapist Semenychev Nickolay
   
 
    No.   Name Lastname Shirt Name Birthdate Height Weight Spike Block Club
  1 Maria Borodakova Borodakova 08.03.1986 190 88 301 297 Dinamo-Kazan
  2   Anastasia Salina Salina 30.12.1988 181 67 295 288 Uralochka-UGMK
  3 Daria Isaeva Isaeva 29.03.1990 186 75 310 304 Fakel
  4   Irina Zaryazhko Zaryazhko 04.10.1991 196 78 305 290 Uralochka-NTMK
  5 Alexandra Pasynkova Pasynkova 14.04.1987 190 75 313 305 Uralochka-NTMK
  6   Anna Matienko Matienko 12.07.1981 182 68 298 292 Dinamo-Krasnodar
  L 7 Svetlana Kryuchkova Kryuchkova 21.02.1985 174 63 290 286 Dinamo Krasnodar
  8   Nataliya Goncharova Obmochaeva 01.06.1989 194 75 315 306 Dinamo Moscow
  9 Kseniia Bondar Bondar 01.02.1990 190 73 305 300 Fakel
  C 10   Ekaterina Kosianenko Kosianenko 02.02.1990 178 64 290 285 Zarechie-Odinzovo
  11 Victoriia Chaplina Chaplina 23.10.1988 188 77 301 295 Uralochka-NTMK
  12   Ekaterina Orlova Orlova 21.10.1987 193 77 307 301 Omichka Omsk
  13 Evgeniya Startseva Startseva 12.02.1989 185 68 294 290 Dinamo-Kazan
  14   Natalia Dianskaia Dianskaia 07.03.1989 185 69 297 292 Severstal
  15 Tatiana Kosheleva Kosheleva 23.12.1988 191 67 315 305 Dinamo-Moscow
  16   Regina Moroz Moroz 14.01.1987 188 70 310 303 Dinamo-Kazan
  17 Natalia Malykh Malykh 08.12.1993 187 65 308 297 Zarechie-Odinzovo
  L 18   Alexandra Vinogradova Vinogradova 11.04.1988 175 72 295 287 Zarechie-Odinzovo
  L 19 Anna Malova Malova 16.04.1990 175 59 286 290 Dinamo Moscow
  20   Anastasia Shlyakhovaya Shlyakhovaya 05.10.1990 192 69 313 307 Omichka Omsk
  21 Valeriya Goncharova Goncharova 03.01.1988 188 70 308 301 Dinamo-Moscow
  22   Elena Novik Novik 23.03.1994 180 66 295 290 Proton
 C = Captain   L = Libero
 
Team profile

The Russian women’s team was founded in 1949 and until 1991 played as the USSR. That changed to the CIS in 1991 before becoming Russia in 1993. They have won the Olympic title four times, the World Championship seven times, the World Cup and the World Grand Champions Cup once, the World Grand Prix three times and the European Championship 17 times.

The world No. 6 took silver at the 2004 Olympic Games, after which a number of changes took place, leading to a terrific year in 2006. They placed second in the World Grand Prix before winning the World Championships. But they were unable to maintain their form and after the Beijing Olympic Games in 2008, where they finished fifth, a number of young players were drafted in to help regenerate the team.

With respected coach Vladimir Kuzyutkin brought in to guide the team towards the 2012 Olympics, results improved immediately and Russia took second place in the 2009 FIVB World Grand Prix. They went even better in 2010, remaining undefeated in the process of defending their World Championship title. Tatiana Kosheleva was named Best Spiker and Ekaterina Gamova was voted MVP.

However Russia and the World Grand Prix seem to have not the same relationship. Having won the last of their three titles in 2002, Russia’s recent World Grand Prix appearances have included silver medals in 2003, 2006 and 2009 whilst not participating in 2005, 2008, 2010 and 2012. In their last appearance in 2011, the Russians finished fourth after losing their final two games 3-0 – to China and bronze-medallists Serbia.

Recent results have also been disappointing. In the 2011 European Championships, Russia crashed 3-0 to eventual bronze medallists Turkey in the quarterfinals before finishing fifth at the London Olympics - again going out at the quarterfinal stage after failing to convert six match balls in the fifth set against Brazil.

With new and ambitious coach in Yuri Marichev at the helm, he will be aiming to harness the immense talent with one eye on the World Championships in 2014 where Russia will be looking to make a three-peat of titles.

Former team leaders Ekaterina Gamova and Liubov Sokolova are no longer in the team however with Maria Borodakova and Nataliya Obmochaeva still there, Russia still packs plenty of punch.
 
Coach profile

Yuri Marichev, 52, was educated at Alma-Ata Institute of Physical Culture and played volleyball for CSKA Moscow (1981-89), Ekzichibashi of Turkey (1991-92), Lefty Tula (1993-96) and Oil Industry Bashkiria (1996-2001). He won two Russian Championships and the European Champions Cup.

As a coach, he has worked with Torch New Urengoy (2001-03), Ural Ufa Ch. (2003-09), Dinamo Krasnodar women’s team (2009-10) and Dinamo Krasnodar men’s team (2010-13). He was coach with the Russian team that won the 2005 World Youth Championship. He became coach of the Russian women’s team in January of this year.